Shooting

Includes: Target Shooting, Rifle Shooting, Airgun Shooting, Crossbow Shooting, Laser Shooting Indoors, Outdoors, Adventurous activities, Sports

Age:
10+
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Hit the target

Carefully supervised shooting activities can be a chance for girls to learn to concentrate, be safe and improve their aim. Managing to shoot a target can be a real confidence boost too!

Overview

Girls can use guns on a range to shoot at targets or clay pigeons.

Members may shoot only at targets (or clay pigeons). Targets must not be shaped like people or animals. Shooting at animals – or people-shaped targets, or participating in war games – is a prohibited activity.

To take girls shooting, you will need to find a reputable local club with qualified instructors.

Shooting is an adventurous activity and should follow the adventurous activity policy and procedures.

Approved: 5 May 2021
Version: 1.0

Content owner: Adventure team

Planning checklist

If you or another member of your leadership team is running the activity at an external venue/location, follow these extra steps:

  • Arrange for a home contact. Leave any route or other relevant details with your home contact and complete a home contact agreement form. Let them know about any changes to your plans.
  • Tell your commissioner.
  • Get a copy of the public liability insurance of the activity provider before you book.
  • Check you hold the relevant qualification (if one is needed) to run the activity and let your commissioner know you plan to run it yourself. If you aren't sure, speak to your local adviser to check.
  • Check with the venue that they have the correct equipment and, if needed, specialist clothing that will meet the needs of your group.
  • Get any specialist equipment or clothing needed to run the activity not provided by the venue, and make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose.
  • Check that any equipment is suitably insured by the provider and agree what happens to the equipment if it gets damaged.
  • Ask for a copy of the venue's safety guidelines and risk assessment (if relevant).
  • Make sure you have the correct ratio of participants (girls, leaders and volunteers) to qualified adults (those running the activity if a qualification is needed). This is different to the ratio of leaders to girls.
  • Consider the ability and experience of the participants and any disabilities, access needs or health conditions and plan the session accordingly.

Some venues might ask for a disclaimer or waiver to be signed for each person taking part in the activity. This is something which parents/carers must sign on behalf of their child. You can do this along with the consent form. Parents and carers should be given sufficient information from the provider along with the waiver so they can make an informed decision to sign it or not. Leaders can only sign disclaimers and waivers for their own personal participation. 

If you're working with an external provider or external instructors to run this activity outside the unit meeting space, follow these extra steps. 

  • Arrange for a home contact. Leave any route or other relevant details with your home contact and complete a home contact agreement form. Let them know if you make any changes to your plans.
  • Tell your local commissioner.
  • Tell the activity provider about the ability and experience of the participants and any disabilities, access needs or health conditions that need to be considered when running the activity.
  • Choose a reputable and licensed activity provider (where applicable).
  • Check the qualified adults hold the correct qualification to be able to run the activity (see the information below).
  • Get copies of the instructor qualifications and public liability insurance of the activity provider before you book.
  • Ask for a copy of the providers' safety guidelines and risk assessment.
  • Make sure you have the correct ratio of participants (girls and volunteers) to qualified adults (those running the activity). This is different to the ratio of leaders to girls.
  • Check with the venue that they have the correct equipment and, if needed, specialist clothing that will meet the requirements for your group.
  • Source any specialist equipment or clothing needed to run the activity not provided by the venue, and make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose.
  • Check that any equipment is suitably insured by the provider and agree what happens to the equipment if it gets damaged.

Some venues might ask for a disclaimer or waiver to be signed for each person taking part in the activity. This is something which parents/carers must sign on behalf of their child. You can do this along with the consent form. Parents and carers should be given sufficient information from the provider along with the waiver so they can make an informed decision to sign it or not. Leaders can only sign disclaimers and waivers for their own personal participation.

The range must be under the control of a range officer who holds one of the following National Small-Bore Rifle Association qualifications:

  • NSRA Youth Proficiency Tutor’s Diploma or higher
  • NSRA Range Conducting Officer qualification or higher

They may also be qualified through the Armed Forces.

Additional instructors should be suitably qualified or experienced in teaching shooting. All instructors work under the direction of the range officer.

Section 21 of the Firearms Act 1968 prohibits the possession of a firearm and ammunition (under any circumstances), by any person who has been convicted of a crime and sentenced to a term of imprisonment or youth custody of three months or more.

The prohibition includes handling and firing at an approved shooting club or at a clay pigeon shoot. It also applies to the possession or use of other categories of firearms and ammunition such as airguns or shot cartridges.

For details of gun legislation outside of the UK, contact the local shooting association. You should consult parents before deciding whether to offer shooting.

Use an established club. You can use one of the following national governing bodies to locate a reputable provider: National Small-Bore Rifle Association (NSRA) or Clay Pigeon Shooting Association (CPSA).

The activity does not have to take place on the club premises. Many campsites and activity centres will allow temporary shooting ranges to be set up, provided they are constructed and supervised by a suitably qualified instructor who is a member of an established club.

Members may shoot only at targets (or clay pigeons). Targets must not be shaped like people or animals.

Adult to child ratios

The ratios below are given as a maximum and ratios must be considered as part of the risk assessment, this may lessen due to any medical conditions, physical ability or other factors.

Leadership team ratio

As this activity will take place outside of your usual meeting place the leadership team adult to child ratio is mandatory.

  • Rainbows: not a Rainbow activity
  • Brownies: not a Brownie activity
  • Guides: 1:12
  • Rangers: N/A, with leader permission

Qualified adult/participant ratio

The activity leader (qualified adult) should determine what size of group is safe. There must be enough qualified adults to ensure the safety of all participants.

The number will be determined by any limitations placed on their qualification, permit or the rules of their operating organisation as well as the risk assessment. This should take into consideration the location, weather and experience of both the qualified adult and other participants. The leader should assess the risk and any concerns must be raised to them.

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