Cricket

Includes: Kwik Cricket, All Star Cricket, indoor cricket, soft ball cricket, french cricket Indoors, Outdoors, Sports

Age:
4+
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Mix up classic cricket

When you think of cricket, hours (or even days)-long matches might come to mind – but there’re plenty of ways you can mix up cricket to have all the fun without needing lots of time and space.

Overview

Cricket's all about teamwork so is perfect for playing with your unit. 

You'll need a small number of bats (they can be plastic), balls and stumps – or you could use a stick or the wall as a target instead!

Try cricket skills and challenges such as hitting, throwing, catching, running between wickets or small games against each other.

Take it further by joining other units in the same district for games or even a mini tournament. Or why not learn umpire hand signals?

You can still make it work indoors...

Practise small games and skills in your meeting space.

You can use balls and bats if you have them, or improvise using balloons, hands or newspaper – it all uses the same skills.

Opportunities with the England and Wales Cricket Board

You can always get someone else in – speak to your local England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) who will be happy to lead a cricket starter session with your unit. Their network of county ambassadors can come to your unit to run sessions for free, creating opportunities for your girls to try their hand at cricket.

There are also handy pick-up-and-go resources developed by the ECB to help you run sessions both inside and outside of your unit.

Approved: 5 May 2021
Version: 1.0

Content owner: Adventure team

Stories and expertise

Planning checklist

If you're working with an external provider or external instructors to run this activity, follow these extra steps.

In your unit meeting place

  • Check the guidance for having an external visitor at your unit.
  • Inform the external qualified adult of the ability and experience of the participants and any disabilities, access needs or health conditions that need to be considered when running the activity.
  • Check the qualified adults hold the correct qualification to be able to run the activity (see the information below).
  • Source any specialist equipment or clothing needed to run the activity that isn't being provided by the external qualified adult, and make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose.
  • Check any equipment you source or borrow is suitably insured and confirm what would happen if there was damage to the equipment. 

At an external venue

  • Arrange for a home contact. Leave any route or other relevant details with your home contact and complete a home contact agreement form. Let them know if you make any changes to your plans.
  • Tell your local commissioner.
  • Tell the activity provider about the ability and experience of the participants and any disabilities, access needs or health conditions that need to be considered when running the activity.
  • Choose a reputable and licensed activity provider (where applicable).
  • Check the qualified adults hold the correct qualification to be able to run the activity (see the information below).
  • Get copies of the instructor qualifications and public liability insurance of the activity provider before you book.
  • Ask for a copy of the providers' safety guidelines and risk assessment.
  • Make sure you have the correct ratio of participants (girls and volunteers) to qualified adults (those running the activity). This is different to the ratio of leaders to girls.
  • Check with the venue that they have the correct equipment and, if needed, specialist clothing that will meet the requirements for your group.
  • Source any specialist equipment or clothing needed to run the activity not provided by the venue, and make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose.
  • Check that any equipment is suitably insured by the provider and agree what happens to the equipment if it gets damaged.

Some venues might ask for a disclaimer or waiver to be signed for each person taking part in the activity. This is something which parents/carers must sign on behalf of their child. You can do this along with the consent form. Parents and carers should be given sufficient information from the provider along with the waiver so they can make an informed decision to sign it or not. Leaders can only sign disclaimers and waivers for their own personal participation.

If you or another member of your leadership team is running the activity, follow these extra steps.

In your unit meeting place

  • Source any specialist equipment or clothing needed. Make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose. Check the equipment is suitably insured and confirm what would happen if there was any damage. 
  • Check you hold the relevant qualification, if one is needed, to run the activity and let your commissioner know you plan to run it yourself. If you aren't sure, speak to your local adviser to check.
  • Make sure you have the correct ratio of participants (girls, leaders and volunteers) to qualified adults (those running the activity if a qualification is needed). This is different to the ratio of leaders to girls.

At an external venue

  • Arrange for a home contact. Leave any route or other relevant details with your home contact and complete a home contact agreement form. Let them know about any changes to your plans.
  • Tell your commissioner.
  • Check you hold the relevant qualification (if one is needed) to run the activity and let your commissioner know you plan to run it yourself. If you aren't sure, speak to your local adviser to check.
  • Check with the venue that they have the correct equipment and, if needed, specialist clothing that will meet the needs of your group.
  • Get any specialist equipment or clothing needed to run the activity not provided by the venue, and make sure this is in good condition and fit for purpose.
  • Check that any equipment is suitably insured by the provider and agree what happens to the equipment if it gets damaged.
  • Ask for a copy of the venue's safety guidelines and risk assessment.
  • Make sure you have the correct ratio of participants (girls, leaders and volunteers) to qualified adults (those running the activity if a qualification is needed). This is different to the ratio of leaders to girls.
  • Consider the ability and experience of the participants and any disabilities, access needs or health conditions and plan the session accordingly.

Some venues might ask for a disclaimer or waiver to be signed for each person taking part in the activity. This is something which parents/carers must sign on behalf of their child. You can do this along with the consent form. Parents and carers should be given sufficient information from the provider along with the waiver so they can make an informed decision to sign it or not. Leaders can only sign disclaimers and waivers for their own personal participation.

Activity ratios

The ratios below are given as a maximum and ratios must be considered as part of the risk assessment, this may lessen due to any medical conditions, physical ability or other factors.

Leadership team ratio

If this activity will take place outside of your usual meeting place the leadership team adult to child ratio is mandatory.

  • Rainbows: 1:5, at least 2 adults
  • Brownies: 1:8
  • Guides: 1:12
  • Rangers: N/A – with leader permission

Qualified adult/participant ratio

There are no specific qualifications for running this activity.

Forms